Search by
See Filters
Dates
From:
To:

Neighborhood

 All

 Manhattan

 Brooklyn

 Queens

 Bronx

 Westchester

 Rockland

 Fairfield

 Nassau

 Suffolk

 Staten Island

 Bergen


Age Group

 All

 Pre-school & younger

 Young elementary

 Tween

 Teen

 Adult

 All Ages


Cost

 All

 FREE

 Paid


Category

 All

 Arts & Crafts

 Classes for Kids

 Classes for Parents

 Fairs/Festivals

 Editor's Picks

 Fundraisers

 Halloween

 Historical/Cultural

 Holiday

 Library Events

 Memorial Day

 Miscellaneous

 Movies

 Museums/Art Galleries

 Nature/Outdoors

 Open Houses

 Shows

 Special Needs

 Sports

 Story Hours

 Volunteer Opportunities

Nature Nook

This event has already taken place. Click here for the latest events.

Add to Calendar 18-01-2014 18-01-2014 15 Nature Nook Families, don't let the barren trees and chilly weather keep you inside! Make the most of the short daylight hours, bundle up and hit the trails. See the sun glitter through the snow-lined branches and observe the birds and squirrels in peaceful, bug-free silence. This might not be the way people are used to enjoying the park, the plants and animals also adapt to the colder temperatures and lack of food through hibernation, migration and other strategies. Snowshoe rabbits even turn white to camouflage in the snow. Most of the park's trees are deciduous, which means they shed their leaves, which then decay and become hummus on the forest floor. The trees themselves stand dormant as they endure frigid temperatures and strong winds. Conifers, or evergreens, are better suited to cold weather. Their waxy, cutin-coated needles last two or three years and help retain water, so they don't dry out. Squirrels, owls, wood ducks, and songbirds take refuge from severe weather beneath the needles of conifers and within the cavities of hardwoods. Other animals take shelter in holes, logs,under rocks, leaves or underground. Chipmunks and other rodents dig tunnels to store food and hibernate. Trees and bushes produce hearty fruits and nuts to help animals survive the winter, such as crab apples and berries. Some animals gather extra food in the fall, store it for the winter, while some spend the season nibbling on moss, twigs and bark. And though many birds are known for flying south, some stick around. Cardinals, blue jays, woodpeckers, chickadees, and gold finches stay and feed off the thickets of berry bushes in the park. Keep an ear out for bird calls and an eye out for animal tracks in the snow when walking in this local winter wonderland! http://www.nymetroparents.com/2014neweventinfo.cfm?id=152524 Alley Pond Environmental Center true DD/MM/YYYY
January 18, 2014
12pm
Alley Pond Environmental Center
Douglaston
All Ages

Description: Families, don't let the barren trees and chilly weather keep you inside! Make the most of the short daylight hours, bundle up and hit the trails. See the sun glitter through the snow-lined branches and observe the birds and squirrels in peaceful, bug-free silence. This might not be the way people are used to enjoying the park, the plants and animals also adapt to the colder temperatures and lack of food through hibernation, migration and other strategies. Snowshoe rabbits even turn white to camouflage in the snow.

Most of the park's trees are deciduous, which means they shed their leaves, which then decay and become hummus on the forest floor. The trees themselves stand dormant as they endure frigid temperatures and strong winds. Conifers, or evergreens, are better suited to cold weather. Their waxy, cutin-coated needles last two or three years and help retain water, so they don't dry out. Squirrels, owls, wood ducks, and songbirds take refuge from severe weather beneath the needles of conifers and within the cavities of hardwoods. Other animals take shelter in holes, logs,under rocks, leaves or underground. Chipmunks and other rodents dig tunnels to store food and hibernate. Trees and bushes produce hearty fruits and nuts to help animals survive the winter, such as crab apples and berries. Some animals gather extra food in the fall, store it for the winter, while some spend the season nibbling on moss, twigs and bark. And though many birds are known for flying south, some stick around. Cardinals, blue jays, woodpeckers, chickadees, and gold finches stay and feed off the thickets of berry bushes in the park.

Keep an ear out for bird calls and an eye out for animal tracks in the snow when walking in this local winter wonderland!

Address: 228-06 Northern Blvd.
Douglaston, NY 11362
Phone: 718-229-4000
Website: alleypond.com

If you go: Please tell them you saw this event on

Upcoming Events at Alley Pond Environmental Center:

  • Animal Tales - Diary of a Worm - 06/13/15
  • APEC Adventure Hour - Baby Animals - 06/14/15
  • APEC’s Summer Barbecue - 06/18/15