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8 TIPS FOR FEELING HAPPIER DURING AN UNHAPPY TIME

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by Gretchen Rubin

Related: happiness, tip, advice, parent, unhappy, mental health, mom,


A recent post by one of our favorite bloggers, Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project.

 

At some points in life, it's not possible -- or at least not easy -- to feel happy. However, even then, it's sometimes possible to feel happier. By taking whatever steps you can manage to give yourself whatever happiness boost is possible, you give yourself a deeper reservoir to deal with your happiness challenge. Here are some strategies to consider:

 

1. Remind yourself of reasons to be grateful. When things look really dark, it's hard to feel grateful, but remembering what's good in your life can help put problems into perspective. I have a friend who recently suffered a big disappointment at work. She said to me, "As long as my family is healthy, I can't get too upset about anything." This may sound like hackneyed advice, but it's really true.

2. Remember your body. Take a twenty-minute walk outside to boost your energy and dissolve stress. Don't let yourself get too hungry. Get enough sleep. Manage pain. When you're anxious, it's easy to stay up late and eat ice cream -- and that's going to make you feel worse in the long run. It's very tempting to run yourself ragged trying to deal with a crisis, but in the long run, you just wear yourself out.

3. Do something fun. Temporarily distract yourself from the stress, and re-charge your battery, with an enjoyable activity. Watching a funny movie is a reliable way to give yourself a pleasant break, and listening to your favorite music is one of the quickest ways to change your mood. When my older daughter was in the intensive-care unit as a newborn, my husband dragged me off to a movie one afternoon -- and that few hours of distraction made me much better able to cope with the situation. Be careful, however, not to "treat" yourself by doing something that's eventually going to make you feel worse (taking up smoking again, drinking too much, indulging in retail therapy). My comfort-food activity is reading children's literature.

4. Take action. If you're in a bad situation, take steps to bring about change. If you're having trouble with your new boss, you could decide to try to transfer. Or you could change your behavior. Or you could find ways to pay less attention to your boss. Ask yourself, "What exactly is the problem?" It's astounding to me that often, when I take time to identify a problem exactly, a possible solution presents itself.

5. Look for meaning. Re-frame an event to see the positive along with the negative. Maybe getting fired will give you the push you need to move to the city where you've always wanted to live. Maybe your illness has strengthened your relationships with your family. You don't need to be thankful that something bad has happened, but you can try to find positive consequences even in a catastrophic event.

6. Connect with friends and family. Strong relationships are a KEY to happiness, so fight the impulse to isolate yourself. Show up. Make plans. Ask for help, offer your help to others. Or just have some fun (see #3) and forget your troubles for a while.

7. Make something better. If something in your life has gotten worse, try to make something else better - and it doesn't have to be something important. Clean a closet. Organize your photographs. Work in the yard.

8. Act toward other people the way you wish they'd act toward you. If you wish your friends would help you find someone to date, see if you can fix up a friend. If you wish people would help you find a job, see if you can help someone else find a job. If you can't think of a way to help someone you know, do something generous in a more impersonal way. For instance: commit to being an organ donor! When you're feeling very low, it can be hard to muster the energy to help someone else, but you'll be amazed at how much better you feel. Do good, feel good; it really works.


Gretchen Rubin is the author of The Happiness Project.

 

 

Also see: Happiness Tip: Cultivate Good Smells

Get More Bang for Your Happiness Buck: Revel in Anticipation


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