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MUSEUMS EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES FOR KIDS AND FAMILIES IN WESTCHESTER WEEK OF MAY 27

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by Kids Events Editor May 27, 2013

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Find fun things to do this week in the NYC area in our Calendar of Events

free and low-cost things to do with kids in Westchester Find free and low-cost things to do with kids at the museums in Westchester this week of May 27. Head to a children's museum for some fun and educational programs for your little ones, or bring the whole family to a museum exhibit for a fun cultural experience. Whether you live in Westchester or are just visiting during the week of May 27 check out these fun and cultural activities and events for some great ideas on how to keep the kids busy. For more free and low-cost upcoming family and children's events in Westchester, go to our complete calendar of events.

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NIGHTWATCH: The Art of Greg Mort - Stamford Museum and Nature Center
Through May 27, 2013 - Stamford

Greg Mort, a Maryland artist with a well-established national reputation, has his eyes firmly in the sky in this selection of original artworks. Mort conveys his awe, respect, and love of nature in his artworks, which can be found at the White House, the Smithsonian Institution and in the collection of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration(NASA). February 16 - May 27, 2013.

THE PRINTS OF ETIENNE LEOPOLD TROUVELOT - Stamford Museum and Nature Center
Through May 27, 2013 - Stamford

Etienne Leopold Trouvelot (1827 ? 1895) had a career as an astronomical artist, after a disastrous career as an entomologist. He introduced the Gypsy Moth to North America accidentally, in 1869. Trouvelot?s exacting details and nuanced shading produced imagery that rivaled even the finest and most technologically advanced photographic images of the time. Today, Trouvelot?s works endure as the most detailed and meticulous illustrations of celestial phenomena ever complied. Included in the exhibition will be images as varied as the Planet Jupiter, The Great Comet of 1881 and the Partial Eclipse of the Moon.

Artist Lecture: Sana Musasama - INSPIRE COMMIT ACT: My Journey from Harlem, New York to Phnom Penh Cambodia; Art, Travel & Social Activism - One World
May 30, 2013 - Port Chester

Reception and Artist Talk at Clay Art Center following the lecture. Artist, Sana Musasama, will talk about her world travel experiences and their impact on her as a woman and an artist. She will explain how the traditional villages of Cambodia have been her home away from home, and share how her extended families, predominately women and little girls, became her guides. Observing the lives of women and little girls, Sana noticed radical differences in their lives from the lives of girls in our culture. Her work is a response to what she saw and what she wants to change.

Family Science Projects - Hudson River Museum
Through May 31, 2013 - Yonkers

Creative activities inspired by the Museum's collections and exhibitions led by Jr. Docents on three Saturdays from 1-4pm: May 4, 11, and 18. Be a Maker and a Tinkerer! Make machines and robots from controllers, motors, and wires found in the Planetarium's storerooms. Participants' creative inventions will be shown on Astronomy Day, May 19th.

Family Arts Projects - Hudson River Museum
Through May 31, 2013 - Yonkers

Creative activities inspired by the Museum's collections and exhibitions led by Jr. Docents on two Sundays from 1-4pm: May 5 and 12. Led by local artist Dahlia Broul, participants create a large-scale panoramic mural as well as their own miniature panoramas or pocket size "endless landscapes" to take home.

Mutt-i-grees® - Stepping Stones Museum
June 01, 2013 - Norwalk

Enjoy a special canine story time and discussion followed by a visit from a shelter dog. Pick up your "Mutt Hutt" keepsake and fill it up with a collectible photo of this month's featured dog. Shelter dogs courtesy of P.A.W.S. Free with museum admission, but tickets required. Limited space. For ages 4 and older. Children under 4 may come to meet the visiting dog at 11:40 am.

Around the World Creative Kids - Stepping Stones Museum
June 01, 2013 - Norwalk

Let your imagination take flight and decorate a lantern, a symbol of Chinese culture and celebration. Free with museum admission, but tickets required. Limited space. For ages 2 and older.

Lure of the Ocean: The Art of Stanley Meltzoff - Bruce Museum
Through June 02, 2013 - Greenwich

This new art and science exhibition features approximately 30 paintings by Stanley Meltzoff, the master of portraying fish in their environments -– from the New Jersey shore to the shallows of the Caribbean and the deep Atlantic waters. February 9-June 2, 2013.

BIRDS OF A FEATHER! - Greenburgh Nature Center
June 02, 2013 - Scarsdale

As wild birds fly overhead, stop by and meet some of the Center's resident birds up close. Have fun while learning about the fascinating lives of birds. A naturalist will present various live birds, including some of the majestic Birds of Prey.

Beyond the Bed: The American Quilt Evolution - Katonah Museum of Art
Through June 16, 2013 - Katonah

Quilts have evolved dramatically in form, fashion, and function during their long and distinguished history. In this exhibition Jean Burks, senior curator at the Shelburne Museum, will explore the wide range of quilts intended as bed coverings, articles of clothing, furniture accessories, wall decoration, and finally, three-dimensional room sculpture. Illustrating a variety of techniques, designs, and cultural styles, the pieces selected will showcase the work of North American quilters working from the beginning of the 19th century to the present. February 24 through June 16, 2013. Major funding for this exhibition was generously provided by The Coby Foundation.

Exhibition: SANA MUSASAMA: My Journey - Clay Art Center
Through June 22, 2013 - Port Chester

Clay Art Center is proud to present "SANA MUSASAMA: My Journey," a solo exhibition that combines art, social justice advocacy, and community arts outreach with New York artist and global citizen, Sana Musasama. The exhibition, which features ceramic sculpture and installation inspired from Musasama's travels around the world, will be on exhibit May 18-June 22, 2013, with an opening reception on Saturday, May 18, from 6-8pm. In conjunction, the artist will be an artist in residence at Clay Art Center for the duration of the exhibit, and Clay Art Center has initiated a string of community arts outreach events entitled, Inspire, Commit, Act... Admission to Clay Art Center is free. In her twenties, when she began traveling, Sana Musasama realized that clay existed all over the world. After her education in the public school system in New York, she felt limited, locked in, and undereducated. Traveling became her way of relearning the world and its inhabitants. Her work is informed by history, women's studies, culture, and her journals of global citizenship. "My Journey," an exhibition of large scale sculpture and installation, will speak of those experiences, from the "Maple Tree" series about the abolitionist movement involved with indigenous Americans, African indentured servants, and Dutch colonialists, and "The Unspeakable" series, an inquiry into the nature of violence and healing in women's lives, to her current work, "The UnKnown/UnNamed" series, which focuses on honoring the lives of those lost to war and genocide. Sana has spent the past 5 years working and traveling in Cambodia. It is there that she found herself in the killing fields, walking on fragments of souls that once were. Sana Musasama's work is grounded in the ceremonies of living. It guards their integrity and memory, and acts as a reliquary of historic events and her personal narratives. In her inquiry into the world, she sought to understand the human landscape. This transformed Sana and her approach to clay. There is no dichotomy between her life and her work, as her extensive traveling has made her relearn seeing. Her mission speaks of a global citizen who walks through the artwork heart first. Inspire, Commit, Act?: Community Events with Sana Musasama. For the duration of the exhibition, Sana will be an Artist in Residence at Clay Art Center, acting as an advocate for her work in the exhibition and the social justice issues it invokes. While in residence, she will also be working on a new body of work. As part of her residency at CAC, Sana will have the opportunity to work with Latino and African-American youth of Westchester County, NY, especially young women, and will be a visual presence for them, inspiring them to commit and act on the belief that they too could be artists, should they want to be. She will be working with Port Chester's Carver Center's NIA group, a young women's leadership group, mostly made up of Latino and African American individuals, Port Chester High School students in CAC's "Around the World in Clay" community arts outreach program, and teen girls from Westhab shelter of Family Coachman Center, which is the largest homeless shelter in Westchester. In addition, Sana will lead three public hands-on workshops in June in the gallery (alongside her artwork). For more details on these workshops, visit clayartcenter.org. ABOUT THE WORK IN THE EXHIBIT About her "Unknown/Unnamed" series, Sana states, "My newest ceramic work was born out of the devastation of the 9/11 attacks and the hundreds of workers and others whose identity was buried under the rubble, the faceless whispers out of concentration camps, the endless mass graves throughout the world. It stems from my global travels to Cambodia, Vietnam and Rwanda - into the homes and hearts of the people I've encountered; these pieces represent their silent voices, which remain unknown and unnamed." "The earth carries the memories built on the backs of oppressed/unrepresented people and their buried bones throughout the world. At My Lai, Vietnam, I walk on the site of a massacre where the lives of hundreds of women and babies were taken in revenge. I touch the soil. At the Holocaust museum, I look at the hundreds of pairs of eye glasses, shoes, gold-capped teeth, and briefcases, and I wonder who they belonged to. In Rwanda, a young woman tells how she searched for her family at a mass burial site. I have worked in Cambodia with former sex slaves, wondering who enslaved them, and walked the killing fields, with their fragments of what once were human beings." "Will it ever stop? These new works are meant to slow us down, make us look closely at our world, silence us for the moment. They are created in homage to the Unknown/Unnamed." Additionally, work from Sana's "Unspeakable" series will be on view. About this challenging and poignant body of work, Sana shares this story: "Twenty-five years ago, while living in Mendeland, Sierra Leone, there was a group of young girls, ages 10-15, who would visit my hut every day. We began our rituals of sisterhood: they combed my hair, tried on my clothing, and applied my makeup. They taught me the formal greetings in Mende, how to sit like a Mende woman, eat with my tongue, and to never allow food to touch my lips. They showed me how to cook on three rocks and wash my clothes in the river, beating on washing stones. They taught me the birth chants, and I learned, too soon, to recognize the death song." "Suddenly, one morning, there were no young girls in the village. They returned thirteen weeks later, changed. Our ritual of sisterhood was no more. They no longer had the sparkle of wonderment in their eyes; they weren't carefree young girls any longer. They didn't want to have anything to do with me. I could not understand. I know now that they were circumcised (incised)." "MY JOURNEY" will also feature two large-scale sculptures from Sana's "Maple Tree" series. These sculptures were inspired by the Maple Tree abolitionist movement in the late 18th century in New York and Holland. Dutch colonists, Native Americans, and free indentured African servants joined together in protest against slave labor on sugar cane plantations in the West Indies. They took as their symbol the maple tree - a source of sugar without exploiting slave labor. At once trees and aspects of the human body, these sculptures explore links between trees and human sexuality, between trees and human agency. Sana Musasama (b. 1957, NYC, lives in Queens, NY) received her BA from City College of New York, NY (1973), her MFA from Alfred (1988), and studied at Mende Pottery, Sierra Leone (1974-75). Feeling undereducated by her public school education, Musasama began traveling as a way to recover identity and cultural place. Clay was a geographic catalyst that brought her first to West Africa, venturing later to Japan, China, and South America. She has continued her quest, expanding her interests to tribal adornment practices in various indigenous cultures. She is challenged by the concerns surrounding the safety of women, specifically the rituals involving rites of passage, female chastity, and the "purification" of the female body. She teaches at Hunter College, NYC; the 92 Street Y, NYC; and through CASES, a program which offers an alternative to incarceration. Clay Art Center is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit ceramic art organization offering exhibitions, clay classes for adults and children, studio spaces for clay artists and outreach programs in the community. It is located in the heart of Port Chester at 40 Beech Street, Port Chester, NY 10573.

Siobhan McBride: 2013 Alexander Rutsch Award and Solo Exhibition - Pelham Art Center
Through June 29, 2013 - Pelham

Siobhan McBride is the winner of this year's Rutsch Award. Step into the dream-like world of her paintings during her solo show. Through June 29.

iCreate Teen Art - Bruce Museum
Through July 07, 2013 - Greenwich

Organized by the Bruce Museum's Youth Committee, Youth@Bruce, this exhibition features approximately 40 juried works of fine art created by regional high school students. The work in oil, watercolor, acrylic, tempera, gouache, pastel, drawing media, traditional printmaking forms, mixed media, and digitally generated demonstrates the range and talent of today's young artists.

Pre-Columbian Remix: The Art of Enrique Chagoya, Demián Flores, Rubén Ortiz-Torres, and Nadín Ospina - Neuberger Museum of Art
Through July 14, 2013 - Purchase

The Neuberger Museum of Art of Purchase College reopens on Sunday, April 28th with the provocative exhibition, "Pre-Columbian Remix: The Art of Enrique Chagoya, Demián Flores, Rubén Ortiz-Torres, and Nadín Ospina." (The Museum had been closed for ten months during extensive renovation work.) The memory of pre-Columbian cultures, of its icons and myths, is ever present throughout Latin America. In fact, in most Latin American countries, the very idea of Pre-Columbian heritage (indigenous culture before European colonization) has been a strategy to reinforce national unity. But this trend is being challenged by four leading Latin American artists, whose work is the focus of the exhibition, "Pre-Columbian Remix," on view at the Neuberger Museum of Art, from April 28 through July 14, 2013. By fusing ancient Aztec, Mayan, or Incan art forms with pop-culture imagery in an ironic and often humorous manner, the artists address present day concerns relating to universal themes of consumption, corruption, and globalization. The result is an engaging, provocative, 21st-century composite portrait. Re-mixed, and renewed, the past becomes accessible under very different perspectives. "By re-mixing elements from different times and places in novel ways, the work of the artists presented here offers a new reading of history," notes Patrice Giasson, curator of the exhibition. "The past is not conceived as a long narrative of successive events in time, but rather as something integrated into the present. This allows the artists to inscribe their own time and concerns into the historical framework." "Pre-Columbian Remix" features more than 90 works of art, including stone sculptures, lithographs, large-scale paintings, platinum and cyanotype prints, and a monumental outdoor inflatable sculpture, on loan from different locations in the Americas (Bogota, Mexico City, San Diego, New Jersey, New York). The works are by Enrique Chagoya, Demian Flores, Ruben Ortiz Torres, and Nadin Ospina. Enrique Chagoya (b. 1953, Mexico City, Mexico; lives and works in San Francisco, CA) Chagoya makes paintings and prints about the changing nature of culture. By juxtaposing secular, popular, and religious symbols, he creates deceptively friendly points of entry for the discussion of complex issues. Pop icons such as Mickey Mouse and Superman are placed side by side with ancient sacred images to create a tension and dialogue between different cultures. The artist addresses colonialism and oppression. Explains Chagoya: "Cultures are transformed and often completely destroyed by conquering ones. The world is endlessly re-mapped and re-named, with new rules and rulers in recurrent holocausts...This is the raw material for my art." Demian Flores (b. 1971, Oaxaca, Mexico; lives and works in Mexico City and Oaxaca) This is the first exhibition of Demian Flores' work in New York, and the most complete survey exhibition he has had in the United States to date. With an intense, direct style, Flores anchors his work in the reality of contemporary Mexico. He mixes images from Mexico's past and present – pre-Columbian warriors, fertility figures, and pyramids, with present day comic book characters and appropriated images from pop culture, such as baseball, soccer, and boxing. This hybrid product reflects controlled violence, and his concerns about the survival of pre-Columbian roots in a world increasingly homogenized by globalization and a different sort of colonization achieved by the bombardment and power of mass media imagery. All this, the artist believes, leads to alienation and a cultural identity crisis in Oaxacan communities. Ruben Ortiz-Torres (b. 1964, Mexico City, Mexico; lives and works in Los Angeles and San Diego, CA) The work of Ortiz-Torres also addresses hybridization, the blend of Mexican and American cultures and what happens when those cultures come together. A resident of Los Angeles, Ortiz-Torres is concerned with transnational cultural media and objects...photography, video, film, painting, baseball caps, custom cars, machinery, puppets, and the collisions of art and culture. "My work interacts with the cultural and iconographic post-national chaos," he once commented. He sees uncertainty, dislocation, and the creative compromises that characterize peoples and places--and considers the possibilities. With the world in transition, he addresses the implications of multiculturalism and the politics of identity. Nadin Ospina (b. 1960 Bogota, Colombia; lives and works in Bogota) Pre-Columbian Remix is the most representative and complete exhibition of Ospina's work to be exhibited in New York. It includes works from one of the artist's most significant body of work known as "El Sueño Americano" (The American Dream). This exhibition also includes Ospina's giant inflatable sculpture, "The Stroller," which was presented at the 7th Havana Biennial (2000) and at the 49th Venice Biennial (2001), and on view now for the first time in New York. "Pre-Columbian Remix: The Art of Enrique Chagoya, Demian Flores, Ruben Ortiz-Torres, and Nadin Ospina" is organized by Patrice Giasson, Alex Gordon Associate Curator of Art of the Americas. The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue edited by Giasson, with additional essays by Joaquin Barriendos, Jaime Ceron, Serge Gruzinski, and Julian Kreimer. Support for Pre-Columbian Remix is provided by the Friends of the Neuberger Museum of Art, and ArtsWestchester, with support from Westchester County Government. Additional funding is provided by Krytzia and Eugenio Minvielle, the Alex Gordon Estate, and the Mexican Cultural Institute of New York. The Neuberger Museum of Art of Purchase College engages and inspires diverse audiences by actively fostering the study, appreciation, understanding and enjoyment of modern art, African art, and the art of our time. The Museum is located at 735 Anderson Hill Road in Purchase, New York (Westchester).

BANK ON THIS - Yorktown Museum
Through July 20, 2013 - Yorktown Heights

An extensive collection of glass banks will be on display in this patrons' showcase. Most of the banks are from the early half of the 20th century. Many of the banks served a duel purpose. Candy, condiments, syrup, and drink mixes would be sold, and the containers would later serve as banks. Pigs, globes, patriotic, and holiday shapes will be shown. Jean and Roy Russo have generously given the Yorktown Museum their large collection of banks and this is the first time it will be on display.

Exhibit: Distant Landscapes by Todd Shapera - Greenburgh Nature Center
Through July 28, 2013 - Scarsdale

For more than two decades, Todd Shapera has been fortunate to document life in remote corners of the planet. Along the way, he's been passionate about capturing the landscapes, often at dawn or dusk when the light is magical, at far away places including Patagonia, the Himalayas, Yukon Rivers, Siberia, Equatorial Rainforests, African Preserves, and more. All are regions with sensitive ecology that are now threatened by global warming. This exhibit will feature highlights from this work. Exhibit runs through July 28, 2013.

Dinosaur Revolution - Stepping Stones Museum
Through September 08, 2013 - Norwalk

Did T-Rex live closer in time to Apatosaurus or your mom? Were dinosaurs warm-blooded? Dinosaur Revolution challenges visitor knowledge, presents cutting-edge discoveries, and debunks popular myths. Experience what its like to feel the earth beneath your gigantic feet as you make tracks in the Triassic. Learn to fly as you glide through the Jurassic. Between May 28 and Aug. 11, a different dinosaur will be the focus of special, creative programming. Daily drop-in programs include arts, crafts, improvisation and play. During designated times each day, children will be able to take part in a dinosaur dig.

Federico Uribe: Fantasy River - Hudson River Museum
Through September 22, 2013 - Yonkers

In a summertime extravaganza, the Hudson River Museum presents a dramatic new 3-dimensional landscape - inspired by the dreams of artist Federico Uribe, acclaimed for his fascinating transformations of everyday objects into art. Witness how he creates sculptures, which are not "sculpted," but instead, constructed and woven in ways, curious and unpredictable, intricate and compulsive. A conceptual artist originally from Columbia, Uribe makes individual works and whole-room installations entirely from objects we see around us - shoes, colored pencils, hangers. Red, blue, yellow, a panoply of colors envelopes in this three-gallery display. For the Hudson River Museum, Uribe creates his site-specific installation, "Fantasy River," inspired by the dramatic rolling banks of the Hudson and the world's other great rivers. Filled with blossoming flowers, flying birds, dazzling sunshine, and the flowing "water" of a winding river, this installation, created from new and old materials, provides a spectacular theatrical experience in the Museum's central atrium. Uribe's art is a unique hybrid that resists classification. Watch how he uses the language of pop art to transform the objects of daily life, while tipping his hat to the history and tradition of classical art. Uribe studied art at the University of Los Andes in Bogota, and in 1988 moved to New York to study with acclaimed conceptual artist Luis Camnitzer. As part of his global vision, Uribe's career includes years of work in Cuba, Mexico, Russia, England and Miami. On view through September 22, 2013.

Exhibit: "Yorktown: People-Places-Products" - Yorktown Museum
Through October 19, 2013 - Yorktown Heights

Although highlighting Yorktown and its surrounding areas, this exhibit could be about any local town in the Hudson River valley. The dominant structure was the church; hotels and summer cabins abounded before accessibility through the nearby northern and eastern mountains. The coming of the railroad moved the center of town from Crompond to Yorktown Heights. Significant residents in town were painter Wallace Putnam, photographer Consuelo Kanaga, editor William Maxwell, Estee Lauder, Lydia Locke, and actress Ann Francis. Over 30 works by local artists will be featured. Folk artist Walter Liebrock, watercolorist Ann Bower, William Nelson, and other talented painters reproduce the look of the town and its surrounding area. The Sta-Hot electric iron was manufactured in Yorktown, and Clarence Birdseye patented his frozen food idea while living in town. There is now a fledgling winery. This is just a microcosm of the display about Yorktown and its surroundings, and should be a fun and nostalgic visit for all. There are also five permanent exhibit rooms, a gift shop, and research library to round out your visit. The exhibit is open April 27 through October 19.

Exhibit: "Yorktown: People-Places-Products" - Yorktown Museum
Through October 19, 2013 - Yorktown Heights

Although highlighting Yorktown and its surrounding areas, this exhibit could be about any local town in the Hudson River valley. The dominant structure was the church; hotels and summer cabins abounded before accessibility through the nearby northern and eastern mountains. The coming of the railroad moved the center of town from Crompond to Yorktown Heights. Significant residents in town were painter Wallace Putnam, photographer Consuelo Kanaga, editor William Maxwell, Estee Lauder, Lydia Locke, and actress Ann Francis. Over 30 works by local artists will be featured. Folk artist Walter Liebrock, watercolorist Ann Bower, William Nelson, and other talented painters reproduce the look of the town and its surrounding area. The Sta-Hot electric iron was manufactured in Yorktown, and Clarence Birdseye patented his frozen food idea while living in town. There is now a fledgling winery. This is just a microcosm of the display about Yorktown and its surroundings, and should be a fun and nostalgic visit for all. There are also five permanent exhibit rooms, a gift shop, and research library to round out your visit. The exhibit is open April 27 through October 19. Museum hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11am-4pm; Saturdays 1-4pm.

Eggs-hibition: Unscrambling Their History - Bruce Museum
Through October 20, 2013 - Greenwich

This new exhibition will delight visitors with an array of eggs. From food to children's fairy tales, Fabergé eggs to pharmacology, Eggs-hibition explores the evolution of the egg, its prominent inclusion in creation myths worldwide, the complex simplicity of its design, and the inspiration it imparts to artists who have painted, bejeweled, photographed, and written about them. March 23-October 20, 2013.

Exhibition: Six Ladders - Katonah Museum of Art
Through April 21, 2014 - Katonah

Bright swaths of vibrant colors transform the Katonah Museum of Art's exterior in its newest outdoor exhibition, "Six Ladders," by artist Andrea Lilienthal. Lilienthal created a series of giant bamboo ladders for the Museum's stately Sculpture Garden that are whimsical and enigmatic; their brilliant colors electrify the natural surroundings. Five ladders, with their cheerful colors and playful patterns, lean against the Museum's enormous spruce trees in various positions and at different angles. On the building's facade, a sixth, 30-foot ladder extends just short of the roofline - its form and ribbons of color energizing the wall and lending sculptural dimension to the flat expanse. Each of the ladders are hand-constructed from sturdy commercial bamboo, harvested in China, and painted with high-gloss outdoor enamel paint from Holland. Their surfaces are smooth and reflective, in contrast to the course-textured tree bark. According to Katonah Museum of Art Curator Ellen Keiter, "These are not functional structures - their bottom rungs are too high to mount and the ladders fail to reach the top of their intended destinations. These are instead beautiful works of art; Andrea Lilienthal responds to the inherent geometry of ladders and the repetitive rhythm of their rungs. She finds beauty in their simple, minimalist construction." "Lilienthal's ladders instill a sense of wonder and suggest that seemingly unreachable goals can be attained," she says. Keiter explains that bamboo is a hollow-stemmed, woody plant that "bows, sways, and splits, so slight imperfections, even substantial cracks, add distinctive character to each ladder. No two ladders are painted the same, yet their similarly saturated hues coalesce into a lively visual harmony." She adds, "The bands of luscious color wrap around the bamboo like candy confections, and bright confetti patterns alternate with stark black-and-white designs. A causal link exists between the artificial colors and the natural bamboo. On one ladder, Lilienthal painted white rings around the growth nodes of the bamboo; on another, the nodes demarcate the lengths of painted blue and orange sections." Says Lilienthal: "These magnificent and mysterious trees [at the Katonah Museum of Art], whose tops are not even visible, dwarf the people and furniture below. In response to their super scale, I chose the ladder, a form with human scale and multiple readings: utilitarian ancient, mythic, and universal. The severe and stately trees support the bamboo ladders in an implied partnership; rooted and stable, the trees assist the ladders in their attempt to ascend. But ultimately, how do you mount an 80-foot Norwegian spruce tree? My answer was to climb it with imagination, affirming our connection to the natural world." Lilienthal has used bamboo in her artistic practice for several years. In earlier installations, she aligned multiple painted, wrapped, or taped bamboo poles along a wall - works awash in color, but still relatable in size. However, her current exhibition at the Katonah Museum of Art is in keeping with the majesty, diameter, and spacing of the giant spruce trees. Adding to the intrigue of this exhibition are enlarged photographs of the Garden's spruce trees displayed in the Museum's two west windows adjacent to the lone 30-foot ladder. On first impression, the images appear as reflections. In this way, Lilienthal reinforces the relationship between the ladders and the trees while further playing with the viewers' perceptions and expectations. Historically, ladders carry rich and universal associations. In many faiths and fables, ladders are a symbol of ascent, of travel, of reaching upward. In modern times, they represent progress and growth, allowing us to reach higher than we would otherwise be able to go. Ladders symbolize elevation: from darkness to light, from ignorance to knowledge, and from the material to the spiritual. They are featured in art from prehistoric cave paintings to contemporary times. Jacob's Ladder, the metaphysical passage between heaven and earth, is mentioned in the first book of the Bible, and is represented in such disparate media as Renaissance paintings and popular video games. There is a popular African-American spiritual, "We Are Climbing Jacob's Ladder," Eric Carl's beloved children's picture book, "Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me," and innumerable colloquialisms regarding "the ladder of success." On view through April 21, 2014 during Museum hours: Sundays: 12-5pm; Tuesdays through Saturdays: 10am-5pm. Closed Mondays.

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