What... (i.e. camp, dance class, birthday party)
        
 
Pick a NYMetroParents Region: All Regions   Manhattan    Brooklyn    Queens    Westchester    Rockland   Fairfield    Nassau    Suffolk  
Family Visiting Big Apple?
Get CityGuideNY's SavingsPack

Dates

from:
Click Here to open the calendar
to:
Click Here to open the calendar

Neighborhood

    All

    Manhattan

    Brooklyn

    Queens

    Bronx

    Westchester

    Rockland

    Fairfield

    Nassau

    Suffolk

    Staten Island

Age Group

    All

    Pre-school & younger

    Young elementary

    Tween

    Teen

    Adult

    All Ages

Cost

    All

    FREE

    Paid

Category

    All

    Arts & Crafts

    Classes for Kids

    Classes for Parents

    Fairs/Festivals

    Fundraisers

    Halloween

    Historical/Cultural

    Holiday

    Library Events

    Memorial Day

    Miscellaneous

    Movies

    Museums/Art Galleries

    Nature/Outdoors

    Open Houses

    Shows

    Special Needs

    Sports

    Story Hours

    Volunteer Opportunities

Calendar > Museums/Art Galleries


Behind the Screen - Museum of the Moving Image
Add to Calendar 03-07-2013 22-12-2013 15 Behind the Screen The core exhibition of the Museum, a one-of-a-kind experience that immerses visitors in the creative and technical process of producing, promoting, and presenting films, television shows, and digital entertainment. Occupying 15,000 square feet of the Museum's second and third floors, the exhibition reveals the skills, material resources, and artistic decisions that go into making moving images. Behind the Screen also introduces visitors to the history of the moving image, from nineteenth-century optical toys to the present-day impact of digital tools on film editing and post-production. Children under the age of fourteen must be accompanied by an adult of eighteen years or older. Artifacts: The exhibition incorporates approximately 1,400 artifacts from the Museum's collection of the material culture of the moving image. These include historic film and television cameras, projectors, television sets, sound recording equipment, costumes, set design sketches and models, make-up, fan magazines, posters, and an outstanding collection of licensed merchandise—dolls, toys, board games, lunch boxes, and more. The Museum has also been a pioneer in collecting video arcade and console games, which are on exhibit and available for play by visitors. Recently acquired objects on view include makeup used on the stars of Sex in the City, a mechanical prop designed by Mike Marino for a climactic scene in Black Swan, and molds and prototypes produced during the creation of a King Kong action figure. Computer-based interactive experiences: Visitors may record their own movements as a sequence of still photographs that can be printed out and made into a flipbook; create their own stop-motion animations, which they can save and email; record their voices over dialogue from a film, following the same procedure that actors use when dubbing their lines in post-production; choose sound effects to add to the images of well-known movies and television shows; add music to scenes from movies, and to experience how music affects mood and tone. Audio-visual material: Behind the Screen includes nearly four hours of audio-visual material that ranges from film clips related to the artifacts on display; projections of the earliest kinetoscope films, The Great Train Robbery, and selections from The Jazz Singer and Nanook of the North, all of which bring key moments in film history vividly to life; special videos, including The First Movies about Etienne Jules Marey and Chuck Workman's Precious Images; and a simulation of a live TV control room, taking visitors inside the room where director Bill Webb called the shots for the broadcast of a game between the New York Mets and San Diego Padres. Commissioned artworks: Artworks created especially for incorporation into Behind the Screen are Tut's Fever by Red Grooms and Lysiane Luong, a real movie theater equipped for video that seats thirty-five; TV Lounge by Jim Isermann, an environment resembling a 1960s living room; and Feral Fount by Gregory Barsamian, a stroboscopic zoetrope using 97 sculptures rotating on an armature to create a short animation. http://www.nymetroparents.com/2014neweventinfo.cfm?id=139695 Museum of the Moving Image true DD/MM/YYYY  

This event has already taken place. Click here for the latest events.


Date: July 03, 2013 through December 22, 2013
Hours: Wed-Thur 10:30am-5pm, Fri 10:30am-8pm, Sat-Sun 11:30am-7pm
Ages: All Ages
Price: $12: $9 students wtih ID: $6 children ages 3-12

Address:
35-01 35 Ave.
Astoria, NY 11106

Phone: 718-777-6888
Website: movingimage.us

Description: The core exhibition of the Museum, a one-of-a-kind experience that immerses visitors in the creative and technical process of producing, promoting, and presenting films, television shows, and digital entertainment. Occupying 15,000 square feet of the Museum's second and third floors, the exhibition reveals the skills, material resources, and artistic decisions that go into making moving images. Behind the Screen also introduces visitors to the history of the moving image, from nineteenth-century optical toys to the present-day impact of digital tools on film editing and post-production. Children under the age of fourteen must be accompanied by an adult of eighteen years or older.

Artifacts: The exhibition incorporates approximately 1,400 artifacts from the Museum's collection of the material culture of the moving image. These include historic film and television cameras, projectors, television sets, sound recording equipment, costumes, set design sketches and models, make-up, fan magazines, posters, and an outstanding collection of licensed merchandise—dolls, toys, board games, lunch boxes, and more. The Museum has also been a pioneer in collecting video arcade and console games, which are on exhibit and available for play by visitors. Recently acquired objects on view include makeup used on the stars of Sex in the City, a mechanical prop designed by Mike Marino for a climactic scene in Black Swan, and molds and prototypes produced during the creation of a King Kong action figure.

Computer-based interactive experiences: Visitors may record their own movements as a sequence of still photographs that can be printed out and made into a flipbook; create their own stop-motion animations, which they can save and email; record their voices over dialogue from a film, following the same procedure that actors use when dubbing their lines in post-production; choose sound effects to add to the images of well-known movies and television shows; add music to scenes from movies, and to experience how music affects mood and tone.

Audio-visual material: Behind the Screen includes nearly four hours of audio-visual material that ranges from film clips related to the artifacts on display; projections of the earliest kinetoscope films, The Great Train Robbery, and selections from The Jazz Singer and Nanook of the North, all of which bring key moments in film history vividly to life; special videos, including The First Movies about Etienne Jules Marey and Chuck Workman's Precious Images; and a simulation of a live TV control room, taking visitors inside the room where director Bill Webb called the shots for the broadcast of a game between the New York Mets and San Diego Padres.

Commissioned artworks: Artworks created especially for incorporation into Behind the Screen are Tut's Fever by Red Grooms and Lysiane Luong, a real movie theater equipped for video that seats thirty-five; TV Lounge by Jim Isermann, an environment resembling a 1960s living room; and Feral Fount by Gregory Barsamian, a stroboscopic zoetrope using 97 sculptures rotating on an armature to create a short animation.

Venue Description: The Museum of the Moving Image, located in Astoria, serves New York City?s cultural scene with impressive collections and exhibitions that relate to film, television, and digital media. The museum?s mission is to foster an appreciation of the combination of art, history, and technology that underlies all forms of digital media. The museum is home to artifacts that attest to the rich history of film and television, and hosts screenings that are at once entertaining and informative, with directors, actors, and film critics often speaking. The museum offers exhibitions that cater to people of all ages. Behind the Screens, an interactive exhibit, is especially fitted for families, with its interactive activities, classic video arcade games, and a daily screening of the film The Red Balloon. Though more than satisfying in its current state, the museum is currently expanding so as to be able to house more exhibitions.There are special programs for educators and students, professional development programs for teachers, an afterschool program, and events for senior citizens.

Upcoming Events at Museum of the Moving Image:

This event has already taken place. Click here for the latest events.

Please let them know you saw this event
in NY Metro Parents!

GET MORE INFO ON THIS LISTING
First Name:
Last Name:
E-Mail:
Phone #:
Dates of Interest (Optional):
I want to know about:
Enter the code number shown below:


This helps prevent spam submissions.

6885


  
Be a good fellow parent and share this with a friend who would be interested
Email Friend

 Subscribe to Our Newsletter
 
 Type your email address here


Email this to a friend

Print this page

Back to Calendar
Back to Calendar of Events

Map


local zones

Nassau

Nassau cont.

Suffolk

Suffolk cont.

Westchester

Westchester cont.

Fairfield

Rockland

Rockland cont.

Queens

Queens cont.

Brooklyn

Brooklyn cont.

Manhattan

Copyright 2014 NY Metro Parents Magazine Site Design: THE VOICE