NewYork-Presbyterian Westchester to Host a Free Event to Help Parents Increase Play, Language, and Social Skills in Children on the Autism Spectrum

NewYork-Presbyterian Westchester to Host a Free Event to Help Parents Increase Play, Language, and Social Skills in Children on the Autism Spectrum

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A parent's guide to early-intervention.

Amy Lemelman, Ph.D., a clinical psychology postdoctoral at NewYork-Presbyterian Westchester, will be hosting a free health lecture on Thursday, April 12 at 10:00am, according to Lohud.com. During this event, parents will learn how to help parents increase vital social skills such as play and language in their children on the Autism spectrum.

The event will take place at the NewYork-Presbyterian Westchester in the second floor auditorium. The hospital is located at 21 Bloomingdale Road in White Plains. No registration is required and free parking and light refreshments will be provided.

Most children will reach developmental milestones, such as holding his head up, sitting, standing, walking, and first words by only a few years old. However, in some cases, children may stall in progression. Down the line, these children may be diagnosed with neurodevelopment disorder, according to lohud.com

Some strategies Dr. Lemelman suggests for early intervention include becoming a play partner with your child, becoming a teacher, adjusting your language, encouraging interaction, and following your child’s lead. Engage in activities that your child finds entertaining. An approach called the Early Start Denver Model allows parents to play and communicate with their child at his developmental level and to build on his strengths.

Another recommended strategy is using single words to communicate with your child on the Autism spectrum if they have little to no words.

“Parents can use the ‘one-up’ rule, which involves intentionally speaking to their child with one-to-two more words than their child uses consistently,” Dr. Lemelman told Lohud.com. “For example, if their child says ‘ball,’ spontaneously, the parent can say ‘ball rolls’ while interacting during the activity.”

 

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