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ONLINE The Art and Science of Snowflakes at Bruce Museum

ONLINE The Art and Science of Snowflakes

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  • Feb. 23, 2021,
  • Bruce Museum
  • 1 Museum Dr., Greenwich
  • All Ages
  • Donations appreciated

Please join the Bruce Museum for a presentation by photographer Don Komarechka and physicist Kenneth Libbrecht about the art and science behind one of winter’s most elegant creations: the snowflake. Learn about the physics behind how snowflakes form and the incredible technology used to capture their beautiful crystalline structures. 

Don Komarechka is a nature, macro and landscape photographer located in Barrie, Ontario, Canada. From auroras to pollen, insects to infrared, much of Don’s photographic adventures reveal a deeper understanding of how the universe works. Exploring the world that we cannot see with our own eyes has been a common thread in Don’s career as a professional photographer.

Always science-minded but never formally trained, Don uses photography as a way to explore and understand the world around him. Photographing something unusual or unknown is the perfect excuse to learn something new. Don’s work often pushes up against the technical limitations of modern camera equipment and the physical limitations of light itself.

Advanced registration required. 

About Bruce Museum

1 Museum Dr.

Greenwich, CT

203-869-0376


    The Bruce Museum is a regionally based, world-class institution highlighting art, science and natural history in more than a dozen changing exhibitions annually. The permanent galleries feature the natural sciences that encompass regional to global perspectives. 

    The museum was originally built as a private home in 1853. Robert Moffat Bruce (1822-1909), a wealthy textile merchant and member of the New York Cotton Exchange, bought the house and property in 1858 and deeded them to the Town on Greenwich in 1908.