Scarecrow: Outdoor Art Exhibit

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October 14, 2012 through November 11, 2012

Open daily during daylight hours.

Lyndhurst

Tarrytown

All Ages

FREE

Event description: For the first time, Lyndhurst is home to an outdoor art exhibition presented within the bare bones of an 18,600-square-foot greenhouse, an historic structure located on the Lyndhurst grounds. Artists were invited to explore the theme of the Scarecrow and look beyond the traditional straw-filled dummy to explore broader themes associated with this figure as human surrogate, decoy, and silent observer. Six artists living and working in NYC, Brooklyn, upstate New York, and New Jersey have been selected for exhibition in Scarecrow. They have created a variety of artworks that respond to the multi-sensory nature of the open-air site and to the unique character of the Greenhouse space. Works included in the exhibition utilize a range of materials from vines and natural plant life, burlap, metal, acrylic, nylon, and digital media. Some artists have responded to the theme by directly referencing the human figure, others have considered the metaphorical and symbolic implications of the scarecrow in works that are more abstract and intangible. The Scarecrow exhibition coincides with the annual "Scarecrow Invasion" at Lyndhurst, a popular Halloween event in which hundreds of scarecrows created largely by children from local school districts are displayed throughout the grounds of the mansion.

Address: 635 S. Broadway
Tarrytown, NY 10591
Phone: 914-631-4481
Website: lyndhurst.org

About Lyndhurst


Overlooking the Hudson River in Tarrytown, New York, is Lyndhurst, one of America’s finest Gothic Revival mansions. The architectural brilliance of the residence, designed in 1838 by Alexander Jackson Davis, is complemented by the park-like landscape of the estate and a comprehensive collection of original decorative arts. Its noteworthy occupants included: former New York City mayor William Paulding, merchant George Merritt and railroad tycoon Jay Gould.

The grounds at Lyndhurst survive as an outstanding example of 19th century landscape design. Elements include sweeping lawns accented with shrubs and specimen trees, the curving entrance drive revealing “surprise” views, the angular repetition of the Gothic roofline in the evergreens, and the nation’s first steel-framed conservatory. The rose garden and fernery are later additions.






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