Oktoberfest Flushing Style:Sauerkraut and Kimchi

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September 23, 2017

5:30-8:30pm.

The Voelker Orth Museum

Flushing

All Ages

$35

Event description: Oktoberfest is an old tradition, of welcoming guests and sharing in the season’s bounty. Today it is enjoyed around the world. At the Voelker Orth they have brought together some of old Flushing and new for a cultural and culinary treat.

Oktoberfest Flushing Style is a fun and affordable fundraiser for the Museum. It is an evening of warm hospitality and lively entertainment, served up with home-cooked fare and tasty brew. Come linger in the twilight in a bountiful garden and help support the Voelker Orth Museum. Bring friends or come on your own.

The evening offers an outdoor grill, serving up German-American cuisine alongside a sampling of Korean-American dishes - uniting two culinary traditions that feature humble pickled cabbage. Norman Curtis will be performing at the keyboard, with appearances by other artists. There’s a raffle to try your luck

Purchase tickets by September 20th at a $30 Early Bird Rate.

Address: 149-19 38th Ave.
Flushing, NY 11354
Phone: 718-729-8567
Website: vomuseum.org

About The Voelker Orth Museum


The Voelker Orth Museum, Bird Sanctuary and Victorian Garden occupies a home that was purchased by a German immigrant named Conrad Voelcker who emigrated from Germany in 1881. After his death in 1930, the house became the home of his daughter, Theresa Voelker and her husband, Dr. Rudolph Orth. Their daughter, Elisabetha Orth, who lived in the house most of her life, in her will established the organization which now runs the museum. The immediate goal of the organization was the restoration of the Voelker Orth homestead. More than a century old, this house has been the home of a single family for nearly its entire history and has changed little since the days of Conrad Voelcker.

A distinguishing feature of the museum is the garden, containing plants that were once regular favorites in the Victorian era. The garden is maintained using eighteenth century propagation methods and gardening techniques, such as hand pruning and the use of natural fertilizers and pesticides. Serving as a sanctuary, the garden’s many varieties of berry bushes and trees attract migrating birds, such as orioles, mockingbirds, and hummingbirds, as well as local species like cardinals and blue jays. In June and July, the butterfly bush attracts monarchs, swallowtails, and other species, and the bee hive is home to a thriving colony of honey bees which produce a modest amount of honey for their educational programs.






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