Lead Found in Baby Food, Study Says

Lead Found in Baby Food, Study Says

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Although it is a concern, here's also why you should not be too worried.

A study conducted by the Environmental Defense Fund found that some amounts of lead have been detected in baby food around the country, according to NBC News.

It is unclear exactly how much lead has been found or which brands are involved, but it is said to have been found in fruit juices; baby fruit juices; root vegetables like carrots and sweet potatoes; and cookies, such as arrowroot biscuits and teething cookies, according to Sarah Vogel, vice president of health at the EDF. 

The maximum amount of lead that is acceptable to consume is six micrograms a day, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Lead consumption cannot be avoided in some foods because “it is in the environment and [lead] cannot simply be removed from food,” according to the FDA’s website.

However, doctors say that parents should not worry about the lead levels in baby food. Maida Galvez, M.D., M.P.H., is an associate professor of environmental medicine and public health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and says that it is often difficult to identify the exact source of lead for children with low levels of exposure and to talk to their pediatricians to address any concerns.

“As a pediatrician, I advise parents to encourage their children to eat a variety of foods, as this will reduce the risks of exposure to a contaminant found in one particular type of food,” Galvez said in a statement. “I also advise limiting juice intake and encourage water instead. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that babies should not be given juice."

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